Somewhere around my 27th or 28th viewing of Mrs. Doubtfire one summer, I remember my dad telling me an anecdote about Robin Williams: that he was able to walk into a room and make a joke about any object he saw. It was this super-sharp, observational humor that set him apart from other comedians and made him a success.
I’ve never been able to confirm if the story was true, but it stuck with me. I wanted to have that skill. It’s probably the reason I’ve subjected my friends to many a C+ joke, but it’s also probably the reason I take in as much as I do at any given time or in any given place. It’s definitely the reason I had any confidence in writing anything for public consumption while I was on tour. Accurate story or not, he shaped my sense of humor and the way I pay attention.
A few weeks ago, I found a To-Do list I made when I first moved to Los Angeles. I had lofty ambitions in late-night comedy (end of joke?), so the list had a bunch of things like classes to take, things to write, things to read. But at the bottom, in all caps, was:
ROBIN WILLIAMS EXERCISE 
And it’s the one thing on the list that still feels relevant.
Robin Williams has a string of movies that I’ll always hold as favorites (some of which are responsible for my biggest aspirations), but I think his greatest impact was in his legend. Salute.
theimpossiblecool:

Robin. 

Somewhere around my 27th or 28th viewing of Mrs. Doubtfire one summer, I remember my dad telling me an anecdote about Robin Williams: that he was able to walk into a room and make a joke about any object he saw. It was this super-sharp, observational humor that set him apart from other comedians and made him a success.

I’ve never been able to confirm if the story was true, but it stuck with me. I wanted to have that skill. It’s probably the reason I’ve subjected my friends to many a C+ joke, but it’s also probably the reason I take in as much as I do at any given time or in any given place. It’s definitely the reason I had any confidence in writing anything for public consumption while I was on tour. Accurate story or not, he shaped my sense of humor and the way I pay attention.

A few weeks ago, I found a To-Do list I made when I first moved to Los Angeles. I had lofty ambitions in late-night comedy (end of joke?), so the list had a bunch of things like classes to take, things to write, things to read. But at the bottom, in all caps, was:

  • ROBIN WILLIAMS EXERCISE 

And it’s the one thing on the list that still feels relevant.

Robin Williams has a string of movies that I’ll always hold as favorites (some of which are responsible for my biggest aspirations), but I think his greatest impact was in his legend. Salute.

theimpossiblecool:

Robin. 

Reblogged from theimpossiblecool

One of the best youngstorytellers Big Shows I’ve experienced.

Our Superfun Summer Session was special because we met every day for 2 weeks (rather than one each week for 2 months), so I think everyone was more focused, more accountable, more excited to see what the next day would bring. And our young writers’ scripts did not disappoint.

There’s magic in this program beyond the objective of completing a 5-page screenplay, and it brought tears to many eyes today as we laughed and were moved by not only stories, but young, brilliant students.

Huge thank you to our actors (who came in and blew the roof off the place) and our incredible team of volunteer mentors (who fight traffic to Culver City every day to act as personal assistants to 10-year olds).

Our program was as follows:

The Danger of Being In The Prairie Without Adults
by Nicole M.
Mentor: Pierre P.
The Quest for the Golden Sock Puppet
by Everett G.
Mentor: Elizabeth Q.
How Lion Becomes King
by Summer M.
Mentor: Stephanie F.
The Quest to the Enchanted Room
by Ari M.
Mentor: Natasha J.
The Story of the Troll
by Isis B.
Mentor: Alex A.
A Search for Atlantis
by Lysander P.
Mentor: Michelle G.
John the Miner
by Elijah G.
Mentor: Mahelet G.
Attack of the Goldfish
by Joseph G.
Mentor: Justin M.
Chomping on Your Problem
by Sofia S.
Mentor: João D.